Error 8000FFFF in Windows Vista Auto-Update

Ey guys, it’s been awhile. And it’s also been awhile since I was bugged with problems with Vista. Your computer may get an error 8000FFF when doing Automatic Updates in Windows Vista. Culprit is most probably the incorrect reporting of the system with 4GB of memory.

To fix this issue, do the following steps:

1. Run cmd [command prompt] as administrator.

2. Type: “reg delete HKLM\Components /v AdvancedInstallersNeedResolving” and then hit Enter.

3. Press “Y” to confirm.

4. Restart your computer and you should be able to run Automatic Updates again.

How to Change Your Forgotten Windows Password Using a Linux OS Disc

Yup! That’s right. Never thought it could be possible but it gave me the creeps when I successfully did it. The trick was actually maneuvered by a big-time geek and it’s just amazing how he was able to infuse the two opposing worlds of proprietary and open-source to work together. 😉 Just a disclaimer on the following steps — this is hardcore!

If ever you get this annoying error message just because AD struck you in a complete surprise:

You’ll surely try to find ways and means to get into your Windows working environment. However, as Windows is not at all that friendly to common users like you, you’ll soon learn that you’re just wasting too much time on something futile. So anyway, why not give this a shot? 🙂

1. Download a copy of Linux’ System Rescue CD and create an ISO image to a cd. You are free to use whatever burning application you have available in your computer.

2. After successfully creating the System Rescue CD, you’ll need to boot from it. (For real beginners: Insert the System Rescue CD into the optical drive (CD-ROM). Change the boot sequence of your drive to the optical drive in the computer’s System BIOS, save changes and restart. This should allow you to automatically boot to the disc inserted in the optical drive.)

3. Upon booting to the System Rescue CD, it will take you to a command prompt screen that looks like this:

4. Mount the hard drive using this command: ntfs-3g /dev/sda1 /mnt/windows -o force. (You can use the df -m command to verify that the drive is already mounted in the right drive. In this example, it is mounted on /mnt/windows.)

5. Change the directory into Windows/System32/config directory inside of the windows installation. Take note that the full path might differ depending on where the Windows folder installation was created. You can do that using this command: cd /mnt/windows/Windows/System32/config

6. The moment you get into that directory, you should be able to see a SAM file, which is where we will change the passwords.

7. In order to change the password, we will use the chntpw command. It’s more effective to use the -l argument first so all the usernames in the file will be listed out.

Command: chntpw -l

8. Add the -u argument with your username (kinda looks like the command below, the username used in the example is geek):

Command: chntpw -u geek SAM

This will take you to this screen:

9. At the prompt, type in your new password and don’t forget to press “y” when it prompts you to save.

10. By this time, your password should already be changed. Type the command reboot to restart the computer. Don’t forget to take the System Rescue disc.

11. Go back to the system BIOS and revert back to your original boot sequence (set it back to the HDD as the 1st boot device). Upon booting up, you should be able to see this screen and should be able to login using your new password.

Have a fun time tweaking your Windows operated computer now! By the way, this works both in Windows XP and Vista operating systems. Ciao! 😉

Sources:

http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/linux/reset-your-ubuntu-password-easily-from-the-live-cd/
http://www.howtogeek.com/howto/linux/create-a-bootable-ubuntu-usb-flash-drive-the-easy-way/
http://www.sysresccd.org/Main_Page
http://linux.softpedia.com/get/System/Recovery/System-Rescue-CD-188.shtml

Inaccessible Boot Device on Multi-Core Processor when re-Starting a Windows Vista Computer

Have you encountered this kind of blue-screen error? Irritating, huh? Well…

Just found out recently after having to experience the same BSOD for 3 times in a row. I tried googling for the answer and fortunately found a convenient explanation and fix in the Microsoft website.

As per Microsoft, the error occurs due to the race inter-lapping of threads reading and written causing a the PCI root node to be missing from the device tree. Hence, the inaccessible_boot_device because the storage is now missing. It’s kind of a brain-twister really but it goes something like that. To go through all the techie-jargons, check out the Microsoft explanation on this. 😉

To resolve this error, download the Microsoft Hotfix.

Internet Connection Lost after Installing MS Security Update KB951748

Internet Connection Lost after Installing MS Security Update KB951748

This happens when you have ZoneAlarm Internet Security or Firewall installed in your computer. The moment the MS Security Update KB951748 finishes downloading and installing in your computer, your internet connection gets lost and you’ll have no idea what caused it.

Here’s the work-around:

1. You can set your ZoneAlarm Firewall Security (Internet Security Zone) from HIGH to MEDIUM.

Other known work-arounds by advanced users would be to uninstall (remove) the MS Security Update KB951748 from the Add/Remove Programs of your Control Panel (this works for Windows operating system users) and then configuring the Windows Update to Turn-off. Or you can also run System Restore then Turn-off your Windows Update afterwards.

Force Dell PC Restore thru BOOT_DSR.exe

To all Dell computer owners out there. Sometimes our computer systems bug down on us big time that the only solution for us to do is to reload the operating system to erase all our problems (only if the issue lies within the depths of the operating system); but what if you don’t have a restore disc or an operating system intallation disc? Is it the end of your world? Do you call their support trunkline?

For all you know, some Dell machines were designed with back-up recovery tool preloaded in the hard drive during its building. With features like Norton Ghost and PC Restore (or Dell Image Restore to some), reloading the operating system in our Dell machines/computers is just at the tip of our hands.

However, what if your PC Restore (which is accessible by pressing Ctrl and F11 altogether) won’t work and won’t let us do the reload? As long as the computer is booting up to Windows (even with all the errors and what-nots), you can still run Dell’s PC Restore function by manually running it from it’s location. Here’s how:

1. Run the Dell PC Restore function from this directory: C:\dell\utilities\dsrfolder.

2. It will just give you a warning, you just have to click YES and it will continue with its process by restarting the computer and boot to the PC Restore Utility.

Or, another way is clicking this executable file: BOOT_DSR.EXE. (I’m not sure though if this work-around will work with Dell systems without Norton Ghost. But heck, you could always give it a shot! 😉 )

To learn more about Dell’s partitioning and PC Restore features, check out these websites for further reading:

1. http://www.goodells.net/dellrestore/fixes.htm

2. http://tinyurl.com/45553j

How to Remove Content Advisor Password in Internet Explorer

Do you want to remove Content Advisor Password in your IE? Follow the steps below:

1) Click on Start and choose Run.

2) Type in RegEdit and select OK.

3) Now click on the little plus sign to the left of H_KEY_LOCAL_MACHINE.

4) Continue to drill down, always clicking on the plus sign at the left of the named key, through Software, Microsoft, Windows, Current Version and Policies.

5) Now click on the Ratings folder.
 
6) In the right pane of the RegEdit window, you’ll see an icon called Key. Click on it and press
    Delete.

7) Next, choose Registry and then Exit to exit RegEdit. You’ve just deleted your original Content
     Advisor
password.

8) Restart the computer and run Internet Explorer again.

9) Choose View and then Internet Options (or Options for version 3.x). For IE 5 or greater, Click
    on Tools, Internet Options.

10) Click on the Content tab and click on Disable. When asked for a password, don’t enter
      anything; just click on OK. This will disable Content Advisor because there’s no longer a
      password.

Source: http://www.pchell.com/support/contentadvisor.shtml

Systems with More than 4GB System Memory Will not Allow Hibernate Power Option.

I’ve recently encountered an issue with systems having more than 4GB of system memory will not allow hibernate power option in both Windows XP and Windows Vista operated systems.

This issue usually occurs due to hibernation is being disabled on computers that have more than 4 GB of system memory.

Hibernation actually requires sufficient disk space to contain and accommodate the contents of the computer’s memory. Tendency is performance consequently is poor on a computer that has more than 4 GB of memory and that has support for hibernation. As a result, Microsoft has disabled support for hibernation on those kind of computers.

As a work-around on this issue, Microsoft suggests to decrease the system memory to 4 GB or less on a computer that is running Windows XP, Server 2003, Vista, or Server 2008. Not quite an option really but surely a leverage.

Source: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/888575